Category Archives: HTC Vive

Firebird – La Peri Review – PC/VR

I’ll keep this review short and sweet, just like the game it’s based on, and when I say game I mean “interactive art piece”. Firebird – La Peri is more of a stage show than a video game and not the kind you’d see on Broadway but more like something in a college experimental theater if all the theater nerds had been forced to join forces with the computer club to do their lighting and effects.

You’ll take on the role of Iskender, a prince seeking the “flower of immortality”. You’ll be right up there on stage as you witness a pretty cool dancing silhouette sparkling with flower petals that you must reach out and snatch away from the guardian spirits that protect her. Admittedly, the graphics are pretty impressive and the VR does a good job of immersing you in the experience, but I have to seriously wonder how many VR gamers are actually into musicals and ballets, or how many theater lovers are into VR.

Firebird – La Peri is based on a ballet/musical composed by Paul Dukas, and we do get a bit of nerd-cred from the narrator, John Rhys-Davis. My only complaint with the experience is that it’s only 15-minutes long and it costs $10 and there is virtually no reason to revisit after your first trip unless (and I stress) you really love musical theater.   The whole thing smacks of a cool tech demo showing us the future of VR Theater – I’d love to see Hamilton in VR, and I certainly don’t need to interact with the production.

I originally played Firebird – La Peri when it was in Early Access but since it has been officially released the developers have added some cool improvements including a desk mode for people with limited room space and also support for Oculus Touch controllers allowing for additional support for the Rift and not just the Vive.

Firebird – La Peri is just a very niche title that I fear won’t find much of an audience on Steam, or at least an audience that won’t play it once or twice then get a refund. The game was recently on sale for the holidays and even at $5 it still seemed a bit steep. I realize the devs need to get paid, but experimental projects like this are best funded by grants or private donations like Kickstarter.

Despite my doubts for how much this game will be a financial success there is no denying that Firebird – La Peri is a beautiful experience with amazing visuals, excellent music and engaging narration, and VR only makes it that much more immersive with no hint of motion sickness.   It’s a great tech demo for VR and certainly those who enjoy the Arts will find it engaging, but I’m guessing most gamers would be very disappointed dropping $10 on this short trip to the theater.

Serious Sam VR: The Last Hope Early Access Review – PC/VR

This is an Early Access Review and as such opinions and scores are based solely on the state of the game at the time of review and subject to change as development progresses leading up to final release.

Combining crazy humor and overwhelming odds when it comes to enemy numbers, Serious Sam has always been one of my favorite FPS games, and now Sam is invading the world of VR with Serious Sam VR: The Last Hope. Rather than the traditional FPS exploration shooter we’ve played in the past, The Last Hope is a stationary wave-based survival game; a genre increasingly common to VR, only this time we get all that classic Serious Sam flavor added to the mix.

The game is presented as a series of VR reenactments from the logs of Sam Stone, allowing you to experience those devastating battles just like Sam did. Starting off with only a pair of simple pistols you’ll earn credits during battle that can be spent to purchase new weapons – nearly a dozen including miniguns, shotguns, lasers, and of course a chainsaw. Between missions, or after each death, you’ll need to spend credits to refill your ammo and replenish your health, and figuring out the perfect mix of weapons for each upcoming level is just part of the challenge…and fun.

The game is overwhelming difficult, and it took me nearly a dozen attempts to finish the first mission. It’s all about prioritizing targets and killing as many enemies as possible before they get too close. It also helps to shoot those money bonuses so you have more spending cash between missions. Each level offers new environment with new monsters coming at you in impossible numbers.

You’ll get to jump around to various planets, each with a distinctive theme. Currently, the Early Access version offers two planets, each with four locations and more deadly arenas will be arriving in future updates. Some of the locations are callbacks to levels from the original series while others are entirely new and pretty awesome. All of the classic music and sound effects are back including those amazing screaming suicide bombers, but the big news is the return of John J. Dick reprising his role as Serious Sam complete with all the trademark one-liners and snappy retorts.

Serious Sam VR: The Last Hope currently supports the Vive and the Oculus Rift using the new Oculus Touch controllers. I tested the game with both and the game works flawlessly on both systems although I found the Oculus Touch lighter weight allowed me to play for longer sessions with less wrist strain. There is also room-scale support allowing you to play the game standing or seated…or lying on the ground when you pass out from complete exhaustion in a quivering meat sack of unbridled nerves.

The Steam version allows you to play the game on either VR system or Oculus owners can get the game directly on their own store. The game does support online co-op, allowing you to face these demonic hoards with a partner, so you might want to consider that when choosing which store/community to purchase your copy. And two new difficulty levels have been added for those who thought the original game was either too challenging or not challenging enough.

It’s definitely worth noting that this isn’t the only Serious Sam game available for VR. Croteam VR also released Serious Sam: The First Encounter in December; that game being a proper FPS rather than a stationary wave-based survival game. It also seems that game is getting more attention in the way of updates than The Last Hope, making me a bit uneasy to recommend this game as much as I would otherwise; especially at the salty price of $40, which is arguably high for a game that is so similar to many others on both VR formats.

There is plenty of fun to be had with Serious Sam VR: The Last Hope, but $40 is going to be a barrier of entry for most casual VR gamers. Almost nothing in the VR marketplace costs that much; especially in Early Access. For the time being I’m going to have to recommend a wait-and-see approach. If the game goes on a Steam sale then check it out, otherwise I’d probably wait until this game exits Early Access and see if it delivers on everything it promises.

We’ll continue to update our coverage and possibly our score for this game leading up to final release so stay tuned…

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BladeShield Review – HTC Vive

BladeShield is a tremendously fun and totally addicting VR arcade game that turns your play space into a futurist space station and your Vive controllers into any combination of shield and light sword. The premise is simple. Using the buttons on each of the Vive controllers you can toggle between light sword and shield in either hand for a traditional sword/shield combo or matching pairs of either as you face off against endless waves of incoming robots, laser turret fire, and other deadly enemies.

The game is totally arcade in its design with your only goal seeing how long you can survive. You are allowed to start your game at Level 15 and 30 to skip previously played waves, but there is no instant score boost for doing so, and since the only real goal is to get a high score on the leaderboards I found no incentive for skipping ahead.

You can use your light sword to slice and dice any robots that get within your blade’s reach or charge it up to release a deadly EMP attack. Your shield is great for not only blocking incoming attacks but also deflecting laser blasts from robots and distant turrets. I was particularly impressed with just how accurate the deflection angles were, and after a few rounds was returning enemy fire with scary levels of precision.

There is a smooth progression of difficulty that starts to get very challenging after you pass level 15 at which point you are assaulted by dozens of robots at the same time. This is when figuring out various strategies of duel wielding shields or twin blades is most effective. If you have incoming laser fire from all sides twin shields will return all that fire, while twin blades works great for incoming ground robots who like to jump attack you. The saw bots are particularly deadly as they circle behind you but only seem to attack from the front.

Your damage meter is clearly displayed at the bottom of your HUD and you will self-heal over time, so it’s simply a matter of not taking too much damage all at once. The robot attack patterns seem to be consistent across the numbered waves, so it is possible to learn the patterns and improve your tactics with time and practice. The tracking of the motion controllers is spot-on, and there is good use of room-scale if you want to move around a bit or lunge forward to slide a robot hovering just out of range.

BladeShield is only $3, which is a ridiculous bargain considering how much fun you’ll have with this even if you only play it once, which you won’t because it’s so addicting with that “just one more try” design to it. I’ve spend 5x this much on games that weren’t half as fun, so if you have some spare change lying around in your Steam Wallet or simply want to play a fun and frantic sword/shield action-arcade game then look no further than BladeShield.

  

Ghost Town Mine Ride & Shootin’ Gallery Review – PC/VR

I have to admit that I went into this review hoping for nothing more than to experience the mine cart ride from Temple of Doom, but what I got was so much more.   Ghost Town Mine Ride & Shootin’ Gallery is a fantastic concept for a fun and thrilling theme-park experience loaded with plenty of scares that will have you sweating, shouting, and hyperventilating when it’s all over. The game is a mix of walking and mine cart riding that clocks in at 20-30 minutes, which honestly is just about all your mind (and heart) can take.   The Steam version supports both Vive and Oculus using the newly released Touch controllers.

The experience starts off innocently enough with you entering the creepy abandoned tourist attraction that was built into the haunted Black Rock Mines. Armed only with a flashlight and a six shooter you’ll need to survive this deadly ride until the end of the rails. At first the danger appears to be simply malfunctioning animatronics and an out-of-control mine cart, but as you explore deeper into the mine all sorts of spectral evil starts to materialize, not to mention bats, spiders, and all sorts of other things to shoot.

The motion controls work nicely allowing you to light the way and accurately shoot at obvious items as well as pop-up targets. Later in the game you will be furiously firing away at demonic hordes or shooting at environmental items to take them out in bulk. The game is loaded with jump scares – almost too many – and most are there just to startle you. Interestingly enough, the designers don’t really bait you into looking in any particular direction, so it’s easy to miss a scary event happing behind you, but this only adds to the replayability on future trips through the mine.

The cart rides are easily the most exciting part of the experience as you duck and tilt your head to avoid obstacles and shoot at targets as they flash by. Some parts of the ride are very fast and can cause motion sickness just like any real-life rollercoaster, but not because of VR. The comfort for this game was surprisingly good. Moving around on foot you simply hold the trigger to walk in the direction of your flashlight beam, while your head-mounted lamp illuminates anything you are looking at. Walking speed is slow – almost too slow – but it does eliminate nearly any chance of motion sickness and is infinitely better than teleporting.

The presentation is outstanding with great graphics and detailed models; especially the animatronic characters that will chip away to reveal their sparking robotic innards. The lighting effects are intense creating moods ranging from uneasy to crap-your-pants scary. There is great use of music and sound to add extra punch to the jump scares.

While you can and likely will die a few times during the ride you will always spawn nearby so you won’t have to replay much of the game. It’s worth noting there is no mid-game save, so you need to finish the ride or you will start from the beginning when you come back. There is limited replay value, mostly since some scary events will go unnoticed on your first (or even second) pass, but Ghost Town Mine Ride & Shootin’ Gallery could have really benefited from a scoring system like Until Dawn Rush of Blood to keep you coming back. Even so, it’s a great ride and one you enjoy watching others take long after your heartbeat has returned to normal.

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Arizona Sunshine Review – PC/VR

I know what you VR gamers are thinking, “Oh no…another zombie shooter”, and you are right. The VR marketplace seems to be overflowing with undead these days, but Arizona Sunshine dares to defy the impossible odds by actually offering a fun, challenging, and totally addictive zombie shooter. Available for the Vive and Oculus Rift/Touch, Arizona Sunshine is an impressive survival game that puts you up against countless zombies in linear story mode for one, or bring along a friend and tackle the story in online co-op, or engage in the hoard mode that supports up to four players.

I tested the game on both the Vive and the Rift using the Steam version of the game. For Oculus owners, the game is also available on the Rift Marketplace and you are better off getting it there, as I’ll explain in a moment.   Arizona Sunshine is a standing experience that encourages moderate movement, so you’ll need at least a 4’x4’ play area otherwise you’ll be spamming the teleport move system to move small distances. The game makes expert use of motion controls, replicating your hands and any items you might pick-up, carry, or wield, like a variety of guns, grenades, and other items like ammo clips and tasty burgers hot off the grill.

While the Steam version of Arizona Sunshine works perfectly fine with the Oculus Touch there is a major glitch with calibration; specifically your height. After hours of testing and swapping out Vive and Rift and talking with the developers it seems the Oculus wants to use the settings for SteamVR’s room-scale rather than the settings you configured when setting up the Touch in the Rift menus. This leads to some crazy height errors where your body clips through the floor/ground. The first time I played the floor was cutting me in half at my waist. After a forced recalibration it was cutting me off at the neck so my perspective was about 8” off the floor.   You can rerun the SteamVR calibration to override the Oculus settings at the risk of corrupting other games in your Oculus/Steam library. Bottom line; if you are playing with the Oculus Touch then it’s best to get the game from the Oculus store which will use only Oculus settings.

Once the game is up and running and your virtual feet are properly on the virtual floor you begin in a trailer with a few random objects you can toss around. At the end of the trailer is a game system where you can insert various cartridges, one of which lets you start a new game or continue an old one. Arizona Sunshine starts you off inside a cave as a new day of zombie-slaying dawns. Exiting the cave you can load up on ammo and munch a beef patty for some health before engaging in target practice with bottles.

Naturally the gunfire attracts some nearby zombies and that’s when the fun begins. Arizona Sunshine has one of the most realistic and difficult shooting mechanics of any game I’ve ever played. First, there is no targeting reticle so you are really aiming down the site if you want those headshots. Ammo is scarce, so firing wildly from the hip at creatures that take numerous body shots to kill is not wise. If you want to survive you’ll want to become the master of the headshot. Also, there is no ammo counter on the screen so you either have to count your shots or be watchful of the slide locking in place indicating it’s time to eject the clip and load a fresh one. If you eject an empty clip it will vanish from the game but clips with rounds remaining stay on the ground so you can pick them up if (when) ammo gets low.

One of the best parts of Arizona Sunshine is the realistic movements required to interact with the world. If you want to eat a burger simply grab it and raise it up toward your real-world head. If you want to take ammo pick it up and move it toward your waist – same motion to reload gun. Grenades are stored on your chest for easy access to grab, pull the pin, and throw. Locomotion is handled with the tried and true teleport system, which some may hate but I found works particularly well in this game. It allowed for fast movement and retreat when overwhelmed and an easy way to position behind cover to drop some zombies.

The game is super-challenging in that ammo is very limited forcing you to search everywhere and everything for new guns and ammo. Early on you’ll be moving down a desert highway with dozens of abandoned cars that you can search by opening doors and trunks, all the while fighting off waves of recurring zombies. My biggest complaint with the entire game is the limited checkpoints. You can quite literally spend 30+ minutes meticulously searching for ammo and killing dozens of zombies only to die and have to do it all over again. And since the zombies spawn at the same time and rush in mostly the same patterns, it can get frustratingly repetitive if you die a lot…and you will die…a lot.

The presentation is fantastic with colorful and detailed graphics that demand a beefy PC for best results. There is plenty of gore, blood splatter, and chunks of skull and brain matter exploding from your headshots. It’s like a super-saturated colorful version of The Walking Dead. There is even some good music and voice acting in the game. And if you thought things were dangerous during the day, just wait until the sun goes down or you find yourself in the claustrophobic confines of the Ol’ Dutchman Mine with nothing but a flashlight to light your way.

Arizona Sunshine is by far one of my favorite VR games. The 6-8 hour campaign is challenging and the online co-op is great if you want to share the scares and your loot. The hoard mode doesn’t seem to have a lot of people playing so it’s difficult to fill out a game, and the scores on the leaderboards seem untouchable at the moment, but even if you only play the single-player game you can easily get your money’s worth in what is certainly the most realistic VR zombie shooter currently available.

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ALICE VR Review – PC

I was pretty excited going into my review for Alice VR. I’m a big fan of the Alice in Wonderland mythos including the games by American McGee, so having a sci-fi game inspired by such fantastic source material piqued my curiosity; especially being in VR. Now available on Steam I tried this game on both the Vive and the Oculus Rift with various degrees of success, both eventually ending in utter failure.

The premise of the game has you playing Alice, woken from your cryo slumber when you ship malfunctions by the shipboard AI in order to repair and refuel the ship in order to continue your journey. Other than your character being named Alice and a few seemingly forced references to Alice in Wonderland, there is little connection to the namesake source material. You get to shrink and enlarge yourself to solve environmental puzzles. This concept makes some sense onboard the ship, but when the same pair of size-changing buttons appear later on the planet with Eat Me and Drink Me signs it makes absolutely no sense.   The Cheshire Cat is now a robot companion and I did see a crude drawing of a white rabbit. The Mad Hatter is supposed to appear but the game broke before I got to him.

I’m not sure that VR really helps the game either in immersion of controls. The graphics are just downright horrible. Even with settings maxed out textures were ugly, levels were void of detail and there was a noticeable shimmering effect like I was playing the game through a wall of water. Things got a little better once I got out of the confines of the ship passages and made it down to the planet. The voice work, music and sound were okay – actually the best part of the presentation.

The game claims 60 puzzles, but since mine broke at the same place every time I only experience about an hour of the game. Exploration and puzzle solving were quite linear. There is usually only one way to go and if there is a choice like an elevator leading to different floors, you are only allowed to press the button to the floor that matters.   Even the anti-grav sections inspired by Prey lacked any challenge or originality. Alice VR is yet another adventure game that is dumbed down into a “walking sim”.

The Vive offers support for motion control but no room-scale so you could play standing up but the only advantage would be to turn around to face different directions – something you can easily do with the side buttons on the Vive wands. You can choose between smooth movement or a teleport scheme for those prone to motion sickness.   The Rift plays with a controller and the devs have no plans to support the Oculus Touch. Considering the limitations of the game I found the Rift the more comfortable experience being able to sit down and just use the gamepad to move around and drive the buggy.

If this game was in Early Access I’d be a bit more forgiving, but when the devs boast about how this game was “Tailor-made for VR from the ground up – no compromises!” then delivery subpar graphics and awkward Vive controls then slap a $25 price tag on it, I have to be overly critical.

Playing on both the Vive and the Rift I was able to get off the main ship, land on the planet, drive a buggy through some canyons with sharks swimming overhead (coolest part of the game) then enter this obelisk and walk across some self-constructing bridge to eat an apple. What loaded after that basically a level that had me spawning outside the world confines into white space with a splotch of blue on the horizon. I couldn’t move or do anything but end the game at this point. Assuming this glitch is ever addressed with a future patch (I was playing on Patch #4) and I am able to finish the game I will revisit the game and rescore the review as necessary, but until then I strongly recommend you avoid this travesty.

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VR Invaders Coming to Steam December 15

Global publisher My.com is proud to debut their first virtual reality PC game, VR Invaders, which is scheduled for release via Steam VR December 15. This brand new game offers a visceral shooter experience on your favorite VR platform in exceptional graphical detail. VR Invaders takes place in the near future and thanks to global corporations, virtual reality programs offer the perfect distraction from life’s hardships. To the delight of the corporations, some people spend almost all of their life logged into the VR programs. However, not everyone stays logged in voluntarily. Sometimes a VR user can’t disconnect because of a software bug or a virus. Corporations often hire freelance hackers called Divers to protect their profits and extract the “Stuck”.​

KEY FEATURES

  • We must go deeper – Engaging story with interesting characters, which unfolds as you “Dive” into a virtual reality program of a future world to save a user that is stuck, and to battle the unforeseen causes of the glitch.
  • Fast-paced action – Shoot with a blaster and block bullets with a shield. Core mechanics are easy to grasp, but using them to the fullest against all the threats will be a challenge.
  • Various levels – Virtual reality is vast. You’ll see radically different and gorgeous environments, from claustrophobic and dark, to enormously big and bright. Level structure shapes the gameplay.
  • Hordes of droids – Enemies are numerous in quantity and type. Each one behaves differently and demands a change in combat tactics. A memorable boss awaits at the end of every level.
  • Slow motion shield power – Freeze time to a halt when you need breathing space. Use this to kill lots of enemies at once or to check that no one is attacking you from the side.
  • Multifunctional blaster – Gather power-ups from killed enemies to temporary transform your cyber weapon into various more powerful modes, such as a laser, a plasma gun or dual blasters.
  • Different play modes – After completing a level in story mode, you can replay it in rating mode on three different difficulty levels to get a high score and become the best cyberspace diver.

VR Invaders is developed by My.com’s in-house studio and delivers a story driven dive into Virtual Reality for HTC Vive, Oculus Rift & Touch owners. Build on Unreal engine 4, VR Invaders puts the player in the role of a Diver. They are special members of a virtual reality rescue force that plunges into VR when dreams turn into nightmares. During a routine operation to rescue a “stuck” user, the player will have to fight back unexpected hordes of droids created by a vicious virus program. Equipped with a blaster that has multiple firing modes and a time-bending energy shield, players can rush through a variety of levels with challenging bosses at the end of each level. Players will be able to use power ups to slow time or even equip dual blasters, which will significantly help in critical situations that are created by the virus program.

Telltale’s The Walking Dead Pinball Coming to Pinball FX2 VR

Zen Studios, creator of hit digital games like CastleStorm and Pinball FX2, Telltale Games and Robert Kirkman, the Eisner Award-winning creator and writer of The Walking Dead for his Skybound imprint at Image Comics, have revealed that they will be bringing the massive hit pinball table, The Walking Dead pinball, to Pinball FX2 VR! Additionally, Zen Studios has revealed that Pinball FX2 VR will be coming to HTC Vive and PlayStation VR in time for the blockbuster table’s release!

The VR version of The Walking Dead Pinball brings the complete experience of the beloved 2014 table into fully immersive virtual reality. You’ll experience choice-driven gameplay along with original story dialogue from the award-winning cast, in scenarios that include choosing who to save and who to leave behind in a walker attack, solving problems and keeping up morale within the group, searching for food and supplies, acquiring important tools, and navigating through the herd amidst an oncoming walker breach. As the action unfolds, walkers bear down on you and you fight your way through all five of the table’s episodes to a thrillingly climactic wizard mode. The undead will be so close you can practically smell them!

Check out a brand new trailer for The Walking Dead Pinball VR

Already a smash hit on Oculus Rift, Pinball FX2 VR is the premiere way to experience pinball in virtual reality. Pinball FX2 VR replicates the atmosphere of real-life pinball machines in a virtual play space, while presenting gameplay features and effects that you simply cannot recreate on a physical machine, where animated toys spring to life on stunningly active table environments with spectacular depth. Additionally, the game’s rich scoreboards will track your Pro Score, Team Score, table stats and more to let you compete against players from all over the world! Pinball FX2 VR includes the following tables for $14.99: Mars, Secrets of the Deep, and Epic Quest.

The Pinball FX2 VR: Season One expansion is also available for $24.99 and adds CastleStorm, Wild West Rampage, Paranormal, BioLab, and Earth Defense to the base game. Even more content is on the way soon!

Pinball FX2 VR hits PlayStation VR in North America and HTC Vive on November 29, 2016 for $14.99, and PlayStation VR in Europe at a later date. The Walking Dead pinball table will be available for Pinball FX2 VR on Oculus Rift, HTC Vive and PlayStation VR for $6.99 on the same day. For more information on Pinball FX2 VR, please visit blog.zenstudios.com.

 

VR Zombie Shooter Arizona Sunshine Arrives on Oculus Rift & HTC Vive this December – Available for Pre-Order Now

Today Dutch independent developers Vertigo Games and Jaywalkers Interactive announced that their VR zombie shooter Arizona Sunshine will launch on 6 December 2016 for Oculus Rift with Touch support as well as for HTC Vive, via Oculus Home and Steam respectively.

Priced at $39.99, the game is now available for pre-order at a 15% discount via Steam (HTC Vive) and Humble Bundle (Oculus Touch). Pre-orders will also receive an Arizona Sunshine compositor image for their headsets, a desktop background image, and concept art from the game.

Arizona Sunshine is developed from the ground up for HTC Vive and Oculus Touch. Step in the midst of a zombie apocalypse as if you were really there, freely move around and explore a post-apocalyptic world, and handle motion-controlled weapons with real-life movements – putting the undead back to rest is more thrilling and satisfying than ever before.

Key features:

  • Real-life weapon handling. Using VR motion controllers, handle, fire, and reload over 25 different weapons with real-life movements. Anticipate attacks, manage your ammo and aim down the sights to blast your enemies to undead pieces.
  • Freely explore your surroundings. Move around without restraints to explore a series of huge southwestern American environments, including blistering-hot deserts, treacherous canyons and deep, dark mines.
  • Enjoy a full-size single player campaign. The campaign mode is built in bite-sized VR chunks that flow together to form a full narrative. Whether you want to jump in for a short session or stay for the complete ride, we’ve got you covered.
  • Join forces in co-op multiplayer. Combine forces with a friend in co-op campaign mode or multiplayer Horde mode for up to four players. But beware, more warm brains mean more hungry undead.
  • Put yourself through serious survival. Scavenge the environment, loot your enemies and manage your ammo and consumables.
  • Experience unprecedented VR realism. When powered by an Intel® Core™ i7 processor or equivalent, Arizona Sunshine brings unprecedented realism to VR gaming with zombie mutilation, destructible environments, and an overall cinematic and immersive experience.
  • Play it only in VR. Arizona Sunshine is a VR shooter exclusively built for VR from the ground up. Step into the midst of a zombie attack as if you were really there and take on undead creatures close enough to touch.

To get a head start on survival in Arizona Sunshine and for a chance at the November 22-29 closed beta, sign up for the newsletter by November 15th at www.arizona-sunshine.com.

Arizona Sunshine will launch for Oculus Touch and HTC Vive on 6 December 2016.